VIDA Blog
Aug 21 2017

VIDA has been CHALLENGED!

myzoneAttention MYZONE users – we need your help!

As you all know, using MYZONE brings out a little friendly competition in all of us. You’re more likely to put in those extra minutes of cardio when you see you’re only 20 MEPs away from your friend on the monthly leaderboard, or to push a little harder so you don’t get called out for being in green while everyone else is in yellow during a cycle class.

Well, the stakes have just been raised and we need all of our MYZONE users to bring their A-game this September! We have been invited to a 45 day challenge against two other fitness clubs – The Atlantic Club in New Jersey and Club Sport in California! Both these clubs are similar in size to VIDA, and they seem to think their members can out-work us this Fall. (Not gonna happen.)

Here’s how it works:

  • You’ll receive an invitation in the MYZONE app to opt-in to our challenge. Hit ‘accept,’ and you’re in!
  • Earn as many MEPs as humanly possible from September 1st – October 15th. We track everything on the back end, no need to do anything else!
  • The club with the most combined MEPs from their Top 100 users wins!
  • Important note: there is no credit for grey or black zone MEPs, only Blue, Green, Yellow & Red. Meaning leaving your belt on while walking home won’t contribute to the challenge – only putting in work at 60% or above!

 

For every VIDA member who earns at least 4,000 MEPs during the challenge, VIDA will donate $10 to ALS TDI (up to $5,000.) Not only will we claim our title as MYZONE champions we’ll help out a great cause too!

If we win, each of our Top 100 users will receive a prize! Don’t have a MYZONE yet? Get yours here just in time for the challenge! You can also get your MYZONE free with a 12 pack of Personal Training this month by clicking here.

Aug 14 2017

Dietitian vs. Nutritionist: What’s The Difference?

VIDA Nutritionist and Dietitian Addie ClaireBy: VIDA Registered Dietitian Addie Merletti 

Dietitian, Nutritionist, whatever..

It’s like the square/rectangle concept we learned in elementary school. All squares are rectangles, but not all rectangles are squares. That’s enough geometry, but it works for dietitians and nutritionists too. All dietitians are nutritionists, but not all nutritionists are dietitians. Why does it matter? It may not to you, but here is what’s required to become a Registered Dietitian:

 

 

1. Complete the undergraduate & graduate level coursework required by the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics

2. Receive a match for a ACEND- accredited Dietetic Internship

3. Complete the ~1200 hour internship with rotations throughout the hospital, food service and in the community (mine was in the athletics department at Notre Dame!)

4. Pass the RD exam and become a Registered Dietitian!

 

Here is what’s required to become a nutritionist:

  1. Possibly take a course or read a book/article about nutrition
  2. Begin calling himself or herself a nutritionist!

 

This is not to say that a nutritionist cannot help you reach your goals! Many of them have undergraduate degrees in nutrition. However, the clinical experience gleaned in the dietetic internship is unparalleled and something I use every day in my practice. An example would be a client who is attempting to gain muscle who has a history of an absorption issue. This person cannot simply follow a traditional “bulking” diet, as they will have serious GI distress and also not successfully gain anything but water. Whether or not you have an underlying clinical condition, it is important to know the educational background of the person giving you nutrition advice.

It is also important to note that unlike Virginia, Washington DC has a Licensure with Exclusive Scope of Practice law. This law licenses dietitians and nutritionists. Only a licensed dietitian or a licensed nutritionist can provide nutrition care including: assessment, goal setting, counseling, or advice. DC statutes include an explicitly defined scope of practice, and performance of the profession is illegal without first obtaining a license from the state. This is a way for the DC board of health to ensure those practicing have the proper education and credentials to be dispensing advice, and are doing so according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics’ Code of Ethics. This ensures evidence-based practice instead of bro-science and results that last rather than pass after a few weeks!

Why should you care? The same reason you would be concerned if your trainer had not passed the CPT exam, or if your dermatologist has not passed his boards, or if your pharmacist had read a book about medicine but didn’t want to take all the time and money to go to pharmacy school. Any of those individuals could be very competent at their job, but it is important to consider the source when making the important decision of what you’re going to use to fuel your body!

Want to schedule a nutrition consultation and analysis with Addie? Check out our Nutrition services or email her at amerletti@vidafitness.com to discover how she can help you make healthier choices that fit your lifestyle! 

Aug 1 2017

How To Recognize Signs of Heat Stroke

Jeff Horowitz -- Heat Stroke AwarenessStay Safe In The Heat: How To Identify Heat Stroke And What To Do If You Encounter It

By: VIDA Personal Trainer & Running Coach Jeff Horowitz

Summer is a glorious time to run, but it can also be dangerous. As your body metabolizes fuel to power your run, it produces a tremendous amount of heat as a by-product. If this heat can’t be lost somehow, the result can be diminished performance, heat exhaustion, heat stroke, and even death.

But that’s no reason not to lace up running shoes and head out the door for a run. Just be sure to be aware of the warning signs of impending trouble, and take the necessary steps to deal with the situation.

Heat stroke doesn’t just happen; before you collapse, there are a number of stages you pass through as your body begins to strain and shut down. If you pay attention to the signs, you’ll be able to take corrective action way before your problem develops into an emergency. Here’s what to look for:

  • Dry Skin. If you are running in the hot sun, you should be sweating. If you are not sweating, you have a problem.
  • Disorientation. We all can get a little befuddled at some point during a long run, but if you have trouble focusing on basic things, like your address or your mom’s phone number (and shame on you if you really don’t know it!), you might be have a problem.
  • Nausea And Dizziness. As your body struggles to disperse heat from your core, it will shunt blood away from your stomach and intestines and push it up to the skin surface. The result can be discomfort in your gastrointestinal tract. Don’t ignore it.

If you find yourself experiencing any of these symptoms, a quick response will keep you from getting into real trouble. Here’s what you should do:

  • Stop. Running creates excess heat. If you get too hot, stop running. Simple, right? Slow down to a walk first, and if you don’t feel better quickly, stop altogether.
  • Get In The Shade. On a hot, sunny day, it can be up to ten degrees cooler in the shade. This may be all the relief that your body needs to get your core temperature under control.
  • Cool Off. Soak your body down with cold water, paying special attention to the wrists and head. Rub your arms with ice, if it’s available, and put some on the back of your neck.
  • Get Help. Don’t be shy; having a medical emergency is no more embarrassing than having your car conk out. Knock on doors and explain what is going on. Ask for water and ice (see above) and for them to call 911 for you.